************** OUR SECOND GRANT PERIOD WAS POSTPONED TO OCTOBER 2021 INSTEAD OF APRIL 2021. **************  LAST DAYS CALL FOR ABSTRACT / Urban Planning Open Access Journal  / The Terms of Dwelling: Re-Theorizing Housing through Architecture / Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2021**************
************** OUR SECOND GRANT PERIOD WAS POSTPONED TO OCTOBER 2021 INSTEAD OF APRIL 2021. **************  LAST DAYS CALL FOR ABSTRACT / Urban Planning Open Access Journal  / The Terms of Dwelling: Re-Theorizing Housing through Architecture / Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2021**************
CA18137 – MCMH-EU
European Middle Class Mass Housing
MCMH has been generally underestimated in urban and architectural studies and there is still a lack of comparative analysis and global perspectives. By crossing different approaches focus on Architecture, Urbanism, Planning, Public Policies, History, Sociology, our network allows a wider understanding of MCMH sprawl, deepening on-going researches and focussing on the existing case studies.
OBJECTIVES
The main aim and objective of the MCMH-EU
The main challenge of MCMH-EU is to create a transnational network that gathers European researchers carrying studies on Middle-Class Mass Housing (MCMH) built in Europe since the 1950s and to develop new scientific approaches by discussing, testing and assessing diverse case studies and their different methodologies and perspectives.
The target groups of the Action include three levels of end users:
  • Academic/scientific working groups;
  • Institutional stakeholders and policymakers;
  • Local communities.
MOU
WORKING GROUPS
MCMH-EU is being developed by 3 Working Groups
WG 1

Documenting the MCMH

WG 2

Development of a specific set of (new) concepts for MCMH analyses

WG 3

Leverage contemporary architecture interventions and Public Policies

COST Action CA 18137
Join Action
CA18137 – MCMH-EU
European Middle Class Mass Housing
MCMH has been generally underestimated in urban and architectural studies and there is still a lack of comparative analysis and global perspectives. By crossing different approaches focus on Architecture, Urbanism, Planning, Public Policies, History, Sociology, our network allows a wider understanding of MCMH sprawl, deepening on-going researches and focussing on the existing case studies.
OBJECTIVES
The main aim and objective of the MCMH-EU

The target groups of the Action include three levels of end users:

  • Academic/scientific working groups;
  • Institutional stakeholders and policymakers;
  • Local communities.

The main challenge of
MCMH-EU is to create a
transnational network that
gathers European
researchers carrying studies
on Middle-Class Mass
Housing (MCMH) built in
Europe since the 1950s and
to develop new scientific
approaches by discussing,
testing and assessing diverse
case studies and their
different methodologies
and perspectives.

WG 1

Documenting the MCMH

WG 2

Development of a specific set of (new) concepts for MCMH analyses

WG 3

Leverage contemporary architecture interventions and Public Policies

WORKING GROUPS
MCMH-EU is being developed by 3 Working Groups

COST Action CA 18137
Join Action

“Les Cahiers de la recherche architecturale urbaine et paysagère”, 8 | 2020
Photo Crédits Sabrina Bresson, Jardin partagé en pied d’immeuble dans un quartier de la rénovation urbaine, Le Sanitas, Tours, Avril 2012.

Architecture et logement social : quels renouvellements ?

Sabrina Bresson, Yankel Fijalkow & Ioana Iosa (coord.)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Yankel Fijalkow represents France in the Management Committee and is the Co-leader of the Working Group 2 of MCMH-EU COST Action.
Yankel Fijalkow is a Professor of Social Sciences at The National School of Architecture of Paris-Val de Seine. He is also co-director of the Research Centre on Habitat “CRH”. He began his career in operational urban planning and supported a thesis under the direction of Marcel Roncayolo (EHESS) on a socio-historical perspective of urban facts. He also taught at the university in sociology and geography planning. He conducts research at various levels on the evolution of urban policy paradigms. He is the author of Sociologie des villes (Paris : La Découverte, 2017, 5th edition).

Sabrina Bresson is a sociologist, lecturer at The National School of Architecture of Paris-Val de Seine and co-director of the Research Centre on Habitat “CRH” (UMR CNRS 7218 LAVUE). Her work analyzes social housing practices, in view of urban transformations and changes in housing design. After a thesis on architectural experiments in social housing (2010), she became interested in alternatives in housing and participated in the activities of a European research network on “Collaborative Housing”. Since 2018, she has been coordinating a research program funded by the USH and the CDC on “collaborative practices in social housing.” She recently published “Collaborative housing and social inclusion. A French perspective” in the journal Housing, Theory and Society.

Ioana Iosa is an architect, doctor of urban planning and researcher at LAA/UMR 7218 LAVUE. Since 2020, she has been a member of the steering committee of the “Housing Tomorrow” (contracted by the French Ministry of Culture), active in the cross-cutting axis “History and Memory of Actors and Processes”. From 2011 to 2012, she also conducted research on self-promotional housing, as well as, from 2016 to 2018, research for MSH Paris Nord entitled “Patrimonialization, urban renewal and sustainable city. The challenges of a district emblematic of the architectural, urban and social experiments of the 20th century: the Maladrerie in Aubervilliers. ». From 2011 to 2014, she participated in the international research program “Conflicts of memory and representation among urban heritage actors: France-Romania-Turkey” supported by several French research organizations and the New Europe College (Bucharest).

ABSTRACT

The dialogue between architecture and social housing has given rise to many experimental projects, various historical examples of which include the garden city movement, the soviet Narkomfin Building, the Karl Marx-Hof in Vienna, Le Corbusier’s Cités Radieuses or the Aillaud Tours in Nanterre, France. Like recent projects, these experiments as well as the spread of heritage awareness throughout the 20th century enriched the thinking of developers and social housing managers. Nevertheless, social housing is defined differently in every country, regardless of whether it is destined for the population’s poorest fringes or open to the middle class, whether it is financed primarily by public authorities or also by other sources, or whether it gives tenants the status of renter or owner. Social housing, often called public housing, is likewise represented differently depending on national context. It strongly contributes to urban renewal, despite being present to varying degrees throughout Europe, from 4 % in Romania to 32 % in the Netherlands. The evolution of its meanings, design, actors or populations leads to new dynamics which act upon forms of architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture as well as upon spatial construction jobs and ways of living. What do these changes signify for social housing production? Which forms of its architectural renewal are we seeing?
This current issue intersects the implications of social housing in architecture within different European, American and Asian countries with the diversity of its forms of organization. A renewal in the debate surrounding social housing architecture, along with its functions and its principal actors, is revealed as we observe a simultaneous trend within housing policies, shifting in favor of market regulation. With the emergence of new challenges (social cohesion, demographic aging, climate change, energy savings, etc.), we uncover ways to adjust supply in terms of change, local context, needs and resources. In this way, the question also arises surrounding the notion of heritage and the meaning of heritigizing 20th century housing ensembles. This is especially the case in France, where the social housing stock is among the largest in Europe.

[+]read more

Open Calls

CALL FOR ABSTRACT / Urban Planning Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-7635 - Volume 7, Issue 1 / The Terms of Dwelling: Re-Theorizing Housing through Architecture / Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2021
New call for Abstract

Submission of Abstracts

1-15 March 2021

Submission of Full Papers

15-31 July 2021

Publication of the Issue

January/March 2022

The Terms of Dwelling: Re-Theorizing Housing through Architecture
open_jornal_issuee

Editor(s)

Yael Allweil (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology) and Gaia Caramellino (Politecnico di Milano)

Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

In the framework of the contemporary global housing crisis, housing has a central, unquestioned role for individuals’ access to employment, education, and political citizenship. Hence the current global crisis involves remarkably similar issues, even if the concrete causes of housing disparity seem unrelated. Whether access to housing is challenged through war and persecution; lack of formal planning; or the growing unaffordability of housing as market product, the effects are the same: the reappearance of substandard tenements, lack of housing options, involuntary displacement, and growing spatial and economic inequality.

For several decades, architecture has been glaringly absent from both the analysis of and responses to the housing crisis. This is in stark contrast to the history of twentieth-century modern architecture, in which architects played a decisive role in defining mass housing as a social need to be provided as a public good and housing design and production constitutes the ground for architectural and planning experiments, playing a crucial role also in the shaping and transformation of the urban fabric.

Two dominant interpretive frameworks were proposed for this lack. The first is explained by the state’s detachment from the national housing project in the mid-1970s, the dismantling of the welfare state and privatization, and later the neoliberalization of housing markets. In this analysis, the social framework for housing as public good has been removed. The second framework points to the tight constraints of housing design, even at the high end of the market, by regulatory and financial considerations, leaving little room for architects’ expression. Consequently, “architecture” as cultural product is often seen as distinct from and separate from “housing” as a socio-economic need.

Nonetheless, the past few years saw re-emergence of the question of housing design in architects’ education and discussions of architecture’s role in and contribution to the world’s growing socio-economic inequality which is fundamentally rooted in the housing crisis (Schumacher, 2018; Self, 2016). Re-theorizing the architecture of housing as an intrinsic part of the social, financial, political, and territorial aspects of dwelling is an urgent component of the critical assessment of past and current experiences and the goal of providing insights to tackle contemporary challenges. This thematic issue of Urban Planning intends to question how the architectural discipline can contribute in closing the divorce between housing and architecture, as well as in re-articulating the question of housing as an architectural and planning problem.

The issue proposes to investigate the terminology used to designate housing as a way to question the relation between housing, architecture and planning culture. Contributions could analyze select terms, concepts and notions, considered in relation to their understanding in the housing discourse and practice, contributing to provide a new insight on urban and planning cultures, forms and policies over the 20th century.

Looking at the lexicon used to discuss dwelling, the papers could also examine the multiple origins and changing meanings of the terms, when shared by diverse fields (normative, political, planning, administrative, financial) or migrating across countries, disciplines, and cultures. Sometimes crystallized or re-invented through images produced to advance specific spatial or social meanings, the lexicon can bring together diverging local and global realms, acquiring an international dimension with diverse implication at local level.

Looking at the lexicon used to discuss dwelling, the papers could also examine the multiple origins and changing meanings of the terms, when shared by diverse fields (normative, political, planning, administrative, financial) or migrating across countries, disciplines, and cultures. Sometimes crystallized or re-invented through images produced to advance specific spatial or social meanings, the lexicon can bring together diverging local and global realms, acquiring an international dimension with diverse implication at local level.

Instructions for Authors

Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).

Open Access

The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

CALL FOR ABSTRACT / DOCONF2021 / Facing Post-Socialist Urban Heritage - Deadline: 31 March 2021
New call for Abstract

Abstract Submission Deadline

31 March 2021

Notification of Acceptance

19 April 2021

Budapest on the 8-9th of October 2021 – Facing Post-Socialist Urban Heritage
budapest

Organizer

BME Urbanisztika Tanszék
Urban Housing LAB
Department of Urban Planning and Design
Faculty of Architecture
Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
urb.bme.hu

The DOCONF series provides a comparative overview of current doctoral research in architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning focusing on the urban challenges related to the physical – built and natural – environment of the post-socialist cities in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), and post-soviet Asia. Those invited include doctoral students or post-doctoral researchers (with a PhD/DLA degree earned after the 1st of January 2016) – specializing in architecture, urban design, urban planning, or landscape architecture.

The DOCONF gives the chance for young researchers to find relevant international context regarding their research topic, to present and discuss in a conference, and to publish a final full paper (15000 – 20000 signs) in the double peer-review DOCONF2021 e-proceedings, or a research poster in the DOCONF exhibition. However, DOCONF gives chance for further publication in scientific journals related to our network (30000-40000 signs). In addition, you could discover Budapest, the capital city of Hungary!

DOCONF2021 proposes six conference SESSIONS with presentations
mass housing // shrinking cities // the fifties // recovery // re-collective // leisurescapes
and a research poster: next normal session.
Every session is prepared, proofread, and moderated by three academics, members of the scientific board, who are university teachers, and most of them are doctoral supervisors 1) at the BME Department of Urban Planning and Design, Budapest;  2) at a university in another post-socialist country; 3) and in a Western country.

For abstract submission give your doctoral data, select your main session (and a second possible), write your title and  250-300 words long abstract proposal related to the general topic of the DOCONF series Facing Post-Socialist Urban Heritage, and to the special topic of your main session.

CALL FOR FULL PAPERS / Urban Planning - Special Issue | Volume 6, Issue 4 / Towards digital urban regeneration: embedding digital technologies into urban renewal processes and development / Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2021
New call for Full Papers

Submission of Abstracts

1-15 December 2020

Submission of Full Papers

15-30 April 2021

Publication of the Issue

October/November 2021

Towards digital urban regeneration: embedding digital technologies into urban renewal processes and development
open_jornal_issuee

Editor(s)

Dalit Shach-Pinsly (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Israel)

dalitsp@technion.ac.il, https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dalit_Shach-Pinsly
https://scholar.google.co.il/citations?user=Do0-KBIAAAAJ&hl=en

Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

During the past decades, mass housing buildings were developed following the post-WWII renewal. Nowadays these housing buildings are old (50–70 years old) and many do not meet the current construction requirements, such as building materials, small apartment sizes, digital and communication systems, green building standards, earthquake-resistant requirements, infrastructure systems, and so on. Therefore, these buildings do not provide a high quality of life for their residents. Because of the large quantities of these mass housing projects and their spread in many cities around the world, these post-WWII buildings now have major potential for urban regeneration processes (Jeffry & Pounder, 2016; Kleemann, et al., 2017).

In parallel to this situation, the modern world is in the wake of the 4th Industrial Revolution, which is characterized by a merger of physical and digital spaces and is consequently affecting cities and their quality of life (Jeon and Suh, 2017). Urban regeneration must take into consideration these digital innovations and harness the emerging technological changes into new development of urban renewal processes and decision-making approaches. Choi and Kim (2017) mention that many cities around the world are preparing to be smart cities via urban regeneration. In addition, these technological changes can also strengthen housing and urban reaction to future pandemic influence, which will improve the urban environment.

This thematic issue will focus on new strategies, models and tools for developing future urban renewal based on integrating new technologies and methodologies. Papers can address any of the following topics, but are not limited to:

– New methods and tools for urban renewal processes
– Digital base urban renewal
– New technologies for urban regeneration
– Post pandemic urban renewal development
– The 4th Industrial Revolution and urban regeneration
– Smart methodologies and tools of decision-making approaches for future urban renewal
– New approaches for evaluating urban renewal

References

Choi, C., & Kim, C. I. (2017). The 4th industrial revolution, smart cities, and sustainable urban regeneration: a perspective study. 환경정책, 25(특별호), 61-91.
Jeffry P, Pounder J, (2016), Physical and Environmental Aspects, in Roberts, P., Sykes, H., & Granger, R. (Eds.). Urban regeneration. Sage
Jeon, J., & Suh, Y. (2017). Analyzing the major issues of the 4th industrial revolution. Asian Journal of Innovation and Policy, 6(3), 262-273.
Kleemann, F., Lederer, J., Rechberger, H., & Fellner, J. (2017). GIS‐based Analysis of Vienna’s Material Stock in Buildings. Journal of Industrial Ecology, 21(2), 368-380.

Keywords

Urban Regeneration, GIS, new models and tools, technology, post pandemic urban renewal.
Please provide a few keywords representative of the thematic issue (maximum of 10 words).

Article

A paper containing original research results that has not been published elsewhere. Articles shall have a maximum length of 6,000 words (including title, abstract, tables, figures, and references list). During a potential revisions stage, after peer-review, authors can extend the article length to a maximum of 8,000 words to better address the reviewers and editors’ comments.

Open Access

The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

CALL FOR PAPERS / ABE Journal / Small-scale Building Enterprise and Global Home Ownership in the Age of Economic Expansion / Deadline: 31 May 2021
New call for Papers

Submission Deadline

31 May 2021

abe-jornal_open-call
Small-scale Building Enterprise and Global Home Ownership in the Age of Economic Expansion

Editor(s)

Section guest-edited by Panayotis Tournikiotis, Professor, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Dr. Konstantina Kalfa, Research Associate (NTUA) and Dr. Stavros Alifragkis, Research Associate (NTUA).

Please send your submissions to abe@inha.fr.

This thematic section of ABE Journal seeks to investigate bottom-up or middling, informal or formal bodies of agents providing private housing and their potential roles in shaping the global homeownership market beyond the dominant regions of northern and western Europe and North America between the Second World War and the end of the twentieth century. These bodies may have taken the form of cooperatives comprising various formulations of landowners, real-estate agents, small-scale building contractors or entrepreneurial housing developers, lawyers, notaries, potential buyers etc. Contributions of individual case-studies or cross-case analyses from around the world will offer a global perspective on small-scale building enterprises and a wider understanding of their protagonists, set-up, modes of operation and (building) practices, as well as the actual products of their labour. A critical reassessment of these projects—whether they be small-scale, mixed-use, multi-storey buildings; row houses; multi-family homes; communal living or cohousing and other types of residential development—will unearth networks of expertise, knowledge and power and the effects of complex, multi-directional cultural transfers including those driven by ex-imperial or new geo-political relationships.

The growing scholarship on post-war informal access to shelter in the Global South begins to unveil a wide range of entrepreneurial house-building practices in urban and peri-urban contexts and legal or illegal markets. Part of this scholarship engages with a substantiated critique of informality’s idealizations, by exposing its historical linkages with broader political and economic agendas during the era of worldwide economic expansion, bookended by the end of the war and the mid-1970s recession mostly in the western world and characterised by the formulation of various “development” strategies and discourses. We wish to move beyond theorizations of historical instances of small-scale building corporations idealized as impromptu and cooperative approaches to housing or—on the antipode—criticized as architecturally unworthy, failed attempts and incomplete paths to modernization/industrialization, and engage instead in a critical understanding of small-scale entrepreneurial practices. In this vein, such entrepreneurial attitudes towards housing, which proliferated between the late-1940s and the mid-1970s, come under different names and formulations, such as “antiparochi” (exchange of a plot for flats on the same property) in Greece, “yap-sat” (construct-sell) in Turkey and “besaaz-o-befroosh” (build-and-sell) in Iran. These geographically far-flung practices, however diverse, appear to share some common ground. They seem to thrive in the absence of, or in the gaps between, a highly regulatory state or a centrally designed policy for social housing in the vein of European housing estates. Furthermore, compared to the European model of social housing, cooperative house-building practices have often allowed for a greater degree of diversity and flexibility, by enabling future occupants to have a say in the design of their own homes and, to a certain extent, the image of their cities. Other similarities may be traced to the fulfilment of basic social rights, such as access to affordable housing for the less affluent, usually associated with the promotion of homeownership or even the gradual formation of the middle-class in their respective countries.

We welcome original contributions that tackle the multi-faceted phenomenon of entrepreneurial house-building practices through the study of local strategies and/or cross-national comparisons. Possible themes may include but are not limited to: small-scale building agencies and their configurations; the profiles of the protagonists-agents; the economic, political, legal or social environment; the building practices or modes of production; the actual typologies and end-products of these processes; and post-construction experiences. We seek methodologically diverse responses to critical aspects of the phenomenon, such as: the potential involvement of the state and other formal agencies (local, nationwide or international); codes, ordinances, regulations, by-laws or laws that may have promoted such practices (such as the sale of transferable floor space index); land acquisition, land speculation and the cost of housing; potential buyers’ involvement in the design of their future homes; and the ideological underpinnings of the very entrepreneurial spirit that legitimized this type of housing practices (e.g. studies of the public discourse as expressed in daily or specialized press). Instances of response to potential transnational flows and/or development of expertise are particularly welcome. In this context in particular, we seek contributions that investigate two specific aspects of the phenomenon: on the one hand, we are interested in nurturing a discussion of small-scale, private house-building initiatives outside Europe and North America as a consequence of post-WWII official housing-aid programs initiated by the USA, the UN, and other international agencies or the particular contribution of specific individuals in the context of an indoctrination to the capitalist ethos of self-effort, risk and investment. We would also be interested in relevant flows or interactions between different countries of the global South; between them and the USSR or Eastern Europe; or between them and southern European nations. On the other hand, we seek insights on how trained local architects—as the local bearers of certain types of methodological/technical expertise—responded to these processes in the light of the formation of professional ethos and practices beyond Europe.

This guest-edited section of ABE Journal aspires to shed fresh light on the making of the modern house and the modern city from the late-1940s and the advent of international modernism until the end of the 20th century. It seeks to broaden modern and post-modern architectural and urban historiography by empowering alternative histories of post-war modernity beyond Europe and North America. Ultimately, this examination will widen current perceptions about the possible strands and shapes of international architectural and urban modernity and the active subjects that have historically produced and/or consumed it.

Submission Deadline

31 May 2021
Please send your submissions to abe@inha.fr.

CALL FOR VIDEOS PROPOSALS - For all Action-Members - Open call
MCMH-EU Youtube Channel

Watch the videos from 7 October!

MCMH-EU is organising a MCMH-EU Youtube Channel with a series of video podcasts from September 2020. This series will allow our action to remain active even in this time of health crisis, especially since we do not know when international travel will be allowed. Besides that, it is a good way to share our research and increase our COST-Action visibility beyond its members.

We are now looking for proposal with this Call for Proposals for all Action-Members. We highly encourage all Action-Members – in particular ITC and Young researchers – to submit a proposal for a video (up to 300 words) within the following thematic categories.

There will be two categories of videos podcasts:

– A short version (6-8 min)
– A long version (15-20 min)
– Lecture Series

The proposal should indicate which category applies.
We are very much looking forward to receive your proposals. Please send your proposal to the relevant WG-leader.

Thematic categories

MCMH History – Historical synopsis (Historical synopsis of a case study)
MCMH Architecture / Urbanism (e.g.: Learning from Projects; Maps/planning/GIS; Typologies; Housing and Collective Spaces; Landscape Views; Covid-19 pandemic)
MCMH Concepts / References (e.g.: Defining Middle Class; Housing and Social Class; Mass Housing)
MCMH Public Policies (e.g.: Country portrait, Case studies)
MCMH-EU Countries (Videos related to the different/selected countries)
MCMH-Touring cities (Videos related to the different/selected countries)
MCMH-Interviews (Interviews with another MCMH-EU member or any MCMH expert)
MCMH-Open Category (You are welcome to suggest another category)

Closed Calls

CALL FOR ABSTRACT / Seminar "Lieux et Enjeux" April 21st, 2021 / History, memories and urban strategies: Meeting between CA MCMH and CRH lab - New Dates - Deadline: Friday, March 12th, 2021 - Closed
New call for Abstract

Abstract Submission Deadline

New Dates – Friday, March 12th, 2021

Notification of Acceptance 

New Date – March 17th, 2021

Seminar “Lieux et Enjeux”
lieux-et-enjeux

History, memories and urban strategies: Meeting between CA MCMH and CRH lab

Wednesday, April 21st, 2021 from 10:00 to 18:00 (CET) By Visio or in face-to-face depending on the evolution of the health situation.

Organizer

French CRH team

Contributions should be sent to the email address: ahmed.benbernou@paris-valdeseine.archi.fr

If you have any questions or requests for information, you can also contact us at the same address.

The members of the French team of our action are pleased to invite you to participate in the call for contributions for the seminar they are organizing on April 21st, 2021.
The purpose of this session is to inaugurate a future cycle of conferences in connection with COST Action MCMH. It will focus on the issue of urban renewal on which the CRH’s competences intersect with the concerns of many CA18137 members. More specifically, the analysis of architectural and urban strategies for the restoration and rehabilitation of the heritage of the modern movement and the identification of the different social processes that seek to maintain or attract the middle classes. More broadly, we will be able to cross-reference the narrative strategies and narrative settings that feed the projects and debates around renovation, rehabilitation and heritage, in relation with the history and the collective memories.

This seminar will be composed of 4 speakers from the French CRH team and 3 to 6 other international speakers from our action whose selection will be made on a simple abstract with the following deadlines:

Deadline to receive abstracts – New Dates: Friday, March 12th, 2021
Participants’ choice – New Dates: March 17th, 2021
Seminar date: Wednesday, April 21st, 2021 from 10:00 to 18:00 (CET) By Visio or in face-to-face depending on the evolution of the health situation.

Contributions should be sent to the email address: ahmed.benbernou@paris-valdeseine.archi.fr
If you have any questions or requests for information, you can also contact us at the same address.

The session will be held in English.

For more information, please find here the link to the preliminary program of the seminar.

CALL FOR POSTERS - New Deadline December 25th, 2020 - Closed
New call for posters

Deadline

December 25th, 2020

Online Survey

November 11th – December 25th, 2020

Evaluation: January 2021

Publication: Spring 2021

Coordinators

Prof. Dr. Uta Pottgiesser

Dr. Müge Akkar Ercan

Dr. Luisa Smeragliuolo Perrotta

Ms. Olga Harea

Mr. Ahmed El-Amine Benbernou

We are pleased to announce the launch of the second call for contributions to produce posters on the theme of middle class and mass housing, that will remain open. You can download the attached poster template and return it to us by email to our action address mcmh.eu@gmail.com.

You have the possibility of making one or more posters. It can present a research, a general presentation of your work, a master’s program, a thesis, the presentation of your research lab, …

Your contributions will be welcome throughout the year.

For information, a collection of posters is being prepared and will be published as a book at Open Access. If you wish to be included in this publication project it is imperative to send us your poster before December 25th, 2020. For posters received after this date, a simple posting on the action website could be considered.

If you would like to participate in this call, we also invite you to take the time to fill our online survey by clicking on the following link: MCMH-Survey and this before December 25th, 2020. This information is needed to improve our analyses and the graphics that are included in the booklet and to complete the data for the future interactive map on our website.

Thank you!

CALL FOR PAPERS - “Optimistic Suburbia II - Middle-Class Large Housing Complexes” - Deadline: 20 December 2020 - Closed
Optimistic Suburbia II - Middle-Class Large Housing Complexes

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline: 20 December 2020
More information

The “Optimistic Suburbia II – Middle-Class Large Housing Complexes” has its starting point in a research on large housing complexes in the outskirts of Lisbon, Luanda and Macau, then enlarged to Antwerp and Milan. In the last decades of the 20th century, these housing complexes were instrumental for the urban growth, showing similarities as well as differences in Europe and beyond. Drawing from this context the conference intends to open the reflection on these complexes on broad realities, showing the multiple features of urbanizations in several geographical, chronological and social contexts.

The objective is to put into perspective the shaping and the pattern of autonomous neighbourhoods, both of private and public promotion, on the outskirts of big cities, for the middle-class and designed in the second half of the twentieth century. Originally isolated in the orbit of large cities, they were characterized by a set of high-rise buildings of modern design, which were progressively articulated with the evolution of the historical city through major roads, which often ended up determining its limits.

This model, which arose in the interwar period (1918-1939), marked, globally and in particular in the cities which were most affected by the two major wars, more than 40 years of an urban planning convinced of the benefits of decongesting the historic centres – freeing them of degraded and insalubrious living conditions –, of the rationalization of the city and of the development of metropolises served by circulatory systems of transportation to wooded suburbs. Imbued with desires of progress and social aspirations of a new culture and optimism, this model was also controversial and the target of criticism.

Although the origin of the referred model is located within an architectonic culture of central European matrix, its use occurred throughout a long time and in very diverse contexts, such as in Africa, South America and Asia (while in the United States of America this model never triumphed, facing the strength of the “American dream house”), with the middle-class as its target.

The objective of this Second International Conference is that of acknowledging the initial principles of the model proposed for the middle-class, describing and reflecting on the diversity of results and on the different ways of appropriation in very diverse geographical, social, chronological and cultural contexts. Therefore, are welcomed researches on architecture, urbanism, architecture and urbanism history, impact on the periphery urban areas, social sciences, economics, cultural issues related with the theme, as art, image and media (publications, film, photography…) and other important subjects. Aspects as terminology, concepts and representation will be addressed as well.

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